Smart Links 29 March 2012

Commentary on a genius, Turkey’s moment of truth, breaking the diamond monopoly, the truth about Bank of America, getting to the 22nd century in one piece, European dependency ratios by 2060, inching to depression, and Canada-Japan free trade.

Meet the Mozart of chess Magnus Carlsen. Thanks to Mary of London.

youtube -- Mozart of Chess: Magnus Carlsen
At age 21, chess grandmaster Magnus Carlsen is the number one player in the world and says he loves to see his opponents squirm.

Turkey at a crossroad.

Financial Times -- Erdogan’s Turkey: A rule more ruthless
A decade on, the AKP government’s hold on power is ever more authoritarian.

Breaking De Beers.

The Atlantic -- Have You Ever Tried to Sell a Diamond?
An unruly market may undo the work of a giant cartel and of an inspired, decades-long ad campaign.

Bank of Avarice. Thanks to Nick of Victoria.

Pdf below -- Rolling Stone - Bank of America - Too Crooked to Fail

Human history is full of examples of civilisations consuming themselves into extinction. Can we prevent the a global middle class from doing the same? Thanks to Tony of Victoria.

Embassy -- Global civilization: The options
How do we reach 2100 without civilizational collapse?

The upside down pyramid.

History’s sad tale.

Project Syndicate -- The Shadow of Depression
Four times in the past century, a large chunk of the industrial world has fallen into deep and long depressions characterized by persistent high unemployment: the United States in the 1930’s, industrialized Western Europe in the 1930’s, Western Europe again in the 1980’s, and Japan in the 1990’s. Two of these downturns – Western Europe in the 1980’s and Japan in the 1990’s – cast a long and dark shadow on future economic performance.

Our oil, your cars.

Toronto Star -- Walkom: Japan free trade pact marks victory for hewers-of-wood economy
Two things of note stand out about the latest proposal for a Canada-Japan free trade treaty.

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Twin Virtues: Inequality of Outcomes & Equality of Opportunity©

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